Multidisciplinary

An application of Dublin Core designed to improve visibility and availability of online resources, originally adapted from the Australian Government Locator Service metadata standard for use in government agencies.

The Common European Research Information Format is the standard that the EU recommends to its member states for recording information about research activity. Since version 1.6 it has included specific support for recording metadata for datasets.

The Data Package specification is a generic wrapper format for exchanging data. Although it supports arbitrary metadata, the format defines required, recommended, and optional fields for both the package as a whole and the resources contained within it.

A separate but linked specification provides a way to describe the columns of a data table; descriptions of this form can be included directly in the Data Package metadata.

A set of mandatory metadata that must be registered with the DataCite Metadata Store when minting a DOI persistent identifier for a dataset. The domain-agnostic properties were chosen for their ability to aid in accurate and consistent identification of data for citation and retrieval purposes.

Sponsored by the DataCite consortium, version 3.0 was recently released in 2013.

An application profile based on the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative Abstract Model, used to describe multi-disciplinary data underlying peer-reviewed scientific and medical literature.

A basic, domain-agnostic standard which can be easily understood and implemented, and as such is one of the best known and most widely used metadata standards.

Sponsored by the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, Dublin Core was published as ISO Standard 15836 in February 2009.

The goal of these standards is to expose the rich content in aggregations of Web resources to applications that support authoring, deposit, exchange, visualization, reuse, and preservation. The standards support the changing nature of scholarship and scholarly communication, and the need for cyberinfrastructure to support that scholarship, with the intent to develop standards that generalize across all web-based information including the increasing popular social networks of “Web 2.0”.

The OpenAIRE Guidelines are a suite of application profiles designed to allow research institutions to make their scholarly outputs visible through the OpenAIRE infrastructure. The profiles are based on established standards and designed to be used in conjunction with the OAI-PMH metadata harvesting protocol:

  • The OpenAIRE Guidelines for Literature Repositories are based on Dublin Core;
  • The OpenAIRE Guidelines for Data Archives are based on the DataCite Metadata Schema;
  • The OpenAIRE Guidelines for CRIS Managers is based on CERIF.

While the focus of each profile is different, they allow for interlinking and the contextualization of research artefacts.

The PREMIS (Preservation Metadata: Implementation Strategies) Data Dictionary defines a set of metadata that most repositories of digital objects would need to record and use in order to preserve those objects over the long term. It has its roots in the Open Archival Information System Reference Model but has been strongly influenced by the practical experience of such repositories. While the Data Dictionary can be used with other standards to influence the creation of local application profiles, an XML Schema is provided to allow the metadata to be serialized independently.

PREMIS was initially developed by the Preservation Metadata: Implementation Strategies Working Group, convened by OCLC and RLG, and is currently maintained by the PREMIS Maintenance Activity, lead by the Library of Congress.

Provenance is information about entities, activities, and people involved in producing a piece of data or thing, which can be used to form assessments about its quality, reliability or trustworthiness. The PROV Family of Documents defines a model, corresponding serializations and other supporting definitions to enable the inter-operable interchange of provenance information in heterogeneous environments such as the Web.

The QuDEx standard/schema is a software-neutral format for qualitative data that preserves annotations of, and relationships between, data and other related objects. It can be viewed as the optimal baseline data exchange model for the archiving and interchange of data and metadata.

Some repositories have decided that current standards do not fit their metadata needs, and so have created their own requirements.

A profile of the Data Package specification, intended for exchanging tabular data in CSV (comma-separated values) format.